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Her Story

UAW - 11 min 16 sec ago

HERSTORY
Learning How to Tell Your Story for Personal and
Union Leadership Development and
Member Engagement and Action

download the pdf of this workshop

Inspiring political, social justice, and labor leaders all understand the value of storytelling to connect to people for action and engagement. Storytelling is a powerful component of leadership building.

This workshop teaches participants the value of storytelling in developing union leadership skills for effective labor-management and union member relations. Participants will learn the value of telling their personal story to move others to action through identification of a goal and a request to the listener.

Effective leaders understand how to tell their story so that they can persuade others to follow them and work with them in common cause. It has been scientifically proven that people remember stories 22 times more than they remember plain facts and statistics. It’s clear that knowing how to tell your story is an important step in leadership development.

However, in the hustle and bustle of everyday life, UAW women (and men) often don’t have a chance to focus on developing their personal story. They may also overlook storytelling as a key component to developing and building personal and organizational leadership skills. They may not realize that they are experienced storytellers already, but need to connect their storytelling experience (bargaining negotiations, grievance handling) to a deeper understanding of what “storytelling” really is and its power for positive transformation and leadership.

By the end of this workshop, participants will understand:

• The role storytelling plays in their personal and union leadership
• How storytelling can be used to focus personal goals and accomplishments for leadership enhancement and progression
• How to tell their union connection story effectively
• How to connect with listeners for action and engagement
• How to connect storytelling into all areas of their union life to strengthen their leadership and member engagement

For this workshop you will need:

• Classroom set up for groups 4-6 at each table
• Overhead projector and screen
• Two flip charts and markers
• Class participant sign-in sheet
• Name tents
• 500-count index card pack or equivalent
• Handouts: Handout 1 – Outlining Your Story – Worksheet; Handout 2 – Outlining Your Story – Sample Outline

Duration: This is a 3.5 hour workshop, divided into one 1.5-hour session and one 2-hour session.

INTRO AND ICEBREAKER – 20 minutes

Notes to instructor: Welcome the class and provide the class background and objectives as described in the cover page notes. Emphasize that the classroom is a safe space for all participants. Connect the class to the labor and UAW experience and their leadership growth. Highlight the many ways storytelling is used in the union movement: by union organizers to bring more members into the union, by grievance handlers to persuade management to grant a grievance, by elected officials, candidates, politicians, human and civil rights activists, union leaders and others to motivate listeners to action.

Emphasize that storytelling is a tool to help us better understand that more connects us than divides us. Storytelling gives us our voice. Storytelling connects the personal to the bigger picture. Allow for any questions to be sure everyone understands the workshop goal.

Have participants count off 1-4 or 1-6 (depending on class numbers) to divide the class into four or six workgroups. Make adjustments where needed to ensure that each workgroup is numerically balanced with an even number of participants because much of the work for this class will be done in pairs. Use a classroom facilitator to work with anyone who doesn’t have a partner.

When people have organized into their table workgroup, ask them to turn to the person on their left and conduct a three-minute interview, asking the following questions. Keep time so that each person has about three minutes to answer the interview questions.

• Name
• Local
• Region
• Worksite
• UAW positions held (if any)
• Community positions held (if any)
• Years of UAW membership
• One thing that most people don’t know about you

Ask for a pair of volunteers from each table to share the information they learned from the person they interviewed. Take volunteers depending on time remaining for this section.

After the information sharing session:

Ask for feedback on how people felt while they were being interviewed.
Ask for feedback on how people felt while they were listening.

Feedback can consist of short explanations (“I had trouble picking one thing about myself”) or just one word (“nervous,” “scared,” “excited,” etc.). Solicit a variety of feedback on feelings to help you and participants get a sense of the emotions and individual comfort levels in the room.

Ask: Did anyone have a hard time sharing something that people don’t know about you? (Allow time for participants to share their experience during the interview process. Again, the sharing can consist of a short explanation [“It was hard for me to pick one thing”] or one word [“shy,” “embarrassed,” “proud,” etc.]).

Tie the feedback responses together and explain that the interview was a form of storytelling. Point out common themes in the room – such as challenges people had focusing on themselves, picking one thing about themselves, opening up to the person interviewing them – and lead the class into the next workshop phase.

THE IMPORTANCE OF STORYTELLING ? PART 1, BREAKING DOWN THE STORY – 70 minutes

Note to instructor: Explain that leaders – and aspiring leaders – need to know how to tell good stories to earn trust and respect from their audience. When we don’t know someone well, or at all, that personal story can be a way to connect so that we pay attention, learn more, and want to join together on a project, campaign, union activity, etc.

Show the YouTube clip at the link below to use as an example of how you can let people know who you are and connect with you in just 30 seconds.

Say: That was a short campaign ad for Lori Millin, a democrat and candidate for the Wyoming House.

Ask: Even though, no one in this room knows Lori Millin, what did you learn about her from watching this 30-second ad? (Answers may include: she’s a mother, she cares about kids’ safety, she’s down-earth, she’s proud to be a woman and mom, she’s a fighter.)

Say: She packed a lot about herself in 30 seconds. Did she seem shy about sharing her story? Did she hold back in talking about what she believed in?

• Ask: What would your reaction have been to this ad if Lori Millin hadn’t talked about her status as a mother? Would it have changed your connection to the ad in any way? (Take some call outs)

Say: This ad was only 30 seconds long, but it packed a punch. And, it didn’t happen by accident. Lori Millin had to figure out what story she wanted to tell voters. She had to practice. She had to focus her body language to look confident. She had to be at her best on camera to convey her story to the public to win support – in her case, to win votes. (and she did win her election).
Now, it’s time for you to think about your story. Let’s start.

Constructing Your Story
Note to instructor: Yu will need to pre-chart these points to begin the individual work in this section of the class. Pre-chart these points.
• Your audience
• Your goal
• Your request for action
• Your “hook”
• Your point(s)
• Five key words/phrases you want people to connect with
Say: We probably don’t pay attention to this when we are telling a story or listening to someone tell theirs, but the most effective stories are told with logic, flow and connection. It takes practice, but you can make your stories more effective if you keep these points in mind.

Refer to flipchart terms and explain:
• Your audience: Know who’s in the room so that you can figure out the best way to connect with them, what you may have in common, what may divide you, what you can say to win them over.
• Your goal: What do you want to get out of sharing your story? Why are you telling it? How do you want your audience to feel about you and what you are asking of them?
• Your request for action: What action (getting more information, voting, participating, donating, etc.) do you want your audience members to take? Is the action doable?
• Your “hook”: What can you tell your audience about yourself that will pull them in – or “hook” them – to follow you or to commit to do as you ask? What can you say to your audience that will allow them to be interested in your story and identify with you?
• Your points: What do you want to cover in your storytelling? How much time do you have? You may have one main point or many – but you need to focus and consider the amount of time you have to convey your point(s) to be effective.
• Five key words or phrases you want to use so people connect with you: These can help you remember your flow from one part of your story to the next. Remember Lori Millin from Wyoming. She started her 30-second political ad holding a child car seat and telling you she was a mother and a fighter. So, in Lori’s case, “mother” and “fighter” and “vote for me” were actual or implied words on her list that she wanted voters to hear and connect with. Those key works (and the car seat prop) set the stage for voters to know, trust and vote for Lori Millin.

Note to instructor: The rest of the morning session will be devoted to participants working on their story outline worksheets. Handout 1 is the worksheet. Handout 2 is a sample worksheet participants can use as a guide for their own outline.

Say: For the rest of this first half of the workshop, you will identify and map out your union story. You will have two minutes to tell it. That’s longer than you think! Check the clock before you begin the outlining process so you have a better idea of what two minutes feels like.

Distribute the handouts: 1) Outlining Your Story and 2) Sample Story Outline. You will explain the handout components and focus on Handout 2 to help participants form their own thoughts for their story.

Say: The flip charts are here to help you keep track of the points you need to hit as you develop your story. Follow the handout prompts to make sure you have all of the important elements for your speech.

Say: You’re also getting a sample completed worksheet to help you outline and structure your story to help you with the organizing process and get you thinking about the direction you want to take.

Note to instructor: Ask whether anyone has any questions about the worksheet and sample and answer as appropriate. Circulate through room with facilitator(s) to answer questions and be sure that participants are on track and understanding concepts. Remind participants that the first thing they have to figure out is what they want to accomplish with their story – and what story they need to fulfill that goal.

NOON – END OF FIRST HALF OF WORKSHOP
BREAK FOR LUNCH

THE IMPORTANCE OF STORYTELLING – PART 2, TELLING THE STORY – 2 Hours

Note to instructor: Welcome the class back and allow for everyone to sit at their prior seat. Give the class 5 or 10 minutes to re-focus by reiterating the morning session’s main points and having them make any adjustments they want to their worksheets.

Place a pack of index cards on every table and say: We’re ready for the next phase of your union storytelling. It’s time to take what you structured on your worksheet and transfer it to index cards. Make the cards work for you. Write as many words as you need to stay on track with your story. Maybe some of you will try to share your story using the FIVE KEY WORDS that you wrote on your worksheet to guide you through your two-minute speech. Remember, you want the cards to help you, not distract you.

Give the class about 15 minutes to organize their index cards and then call time and direct the class as follows.

Say: Now it’s time to test your story to see how you feel telling it and how your audience feels hearing it. Turn to the person on your right. Each of you will have about two minutes to tell your story to one another. I’ll be generous with the two minutes because this will be your first time telling the story.

Allow everyone to take the time to tell their story to their partner. You don’t have to be a stickler with
the two minutes, but keep an eye on the clock and after 6-8 minutes:

Say: Let’s share some reactions to the telling and listening. First, let’s talk about the storytelling experience. How did telling your story make you feel? (Get several reactions to give the class a sense of the various experiences – different and common. Spend about 5 minutes listening and connecting responses for participants and having them connect their reactions to what others say.)

Say: Now, let’s talk about the listening experience. How did you feel in that role? Did the story you heard persuade you to take the requested action? Why? Why not? (Get several reactions to give the class a sense of the various experiences – different and common. Spend about 5 minutes listening and connecting responses for participants and having them connect their reactions to what others say.)

Note to instructor: After this process, repeat the exercise to compare the storytelling/listening experience with more practice. All prior participant pairs should remain the same for this exercise.

Say: We’re going to repeat the storytelling and listening exercise and compare the second go-around with the first one. But this time, we’re going to stick closer to the two-minute mark. We’ll keep the same pairs for this repeat.

Note to instructor: Allow 5 minutes for this exercise, which includes the two minutes for each pair and one minute to have everyone refocus and come together as a class.

Say: We’ll start with the storytelling perspective. Did you feel any differences telling your story the second time?

Say: From the listening perspective, did you feel any differences hearing the story the second time? Did you feel a different response in yourself in reaction to the storyteller’s call to action?

Note to instructor: Facilitate discussion among participants on differences between the first and second storytelling/listening experiences. Highlight the value of practice and its impact on building confidence. Remind participants that body language is important to show confidence. Connect participants to situations where storytelling helps build our union (contract negotiations, grievance handling, GOTV door-step conversations, member recruitment). Share your own story about one of these situations. Remind participants that active listening is equally important to communication and relationship-building. Both storytelling and listening are essential for productive labor-management relations and internal union relations with members, leaders, and the community.

Note to instructor: You should have about 1 hour remaining in the class by this point. Transition into the final phase of the workshop.

Say: Now, we’re going to give you a bigger audience to share your story with. Who’s ready to tell their story to the whole class? (Encourage participation and support for the speaker. Encourage respectful and active listening.)

Note to instructor: Spend the remainder of the class having participants tell their story and listeners providing constructive feedback. If someone wants to try telling their story a second time, allow it, time permitting. Leave 5 minutes to wrap up the workshop.

Conclude by thanking everyone for their attention and say: You should now be able to connect the importance of storytelling and listening to your work and leadership skill-building in the UAW and in your community. Being part of the labor movement is personal. It’s a movement that touches us, our families, our communities, and our country. Make your storytelling personal so you can too connect with others in your union life and motivate them to action. You have powerful union stories worth telling – and hearing.

HERSTORY – Handout 1
Outlining Your Story
WORKSHEET

Inspiring political, social justice, and labor leaders all understand the value of storytelling to connect people for action and engagement. Storytelling is a powerful component of leadership building and it is at the core of effective labor-management relations and motivating union member involvement.

Outlining your union story will help you focus on the point(s) you want to make and the goal(s) you want to accomplish by telling it.

THE OVERALL MESSAGE OF MY UNION STORY IS:

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

MY LISTENER(S)/AUDIENCE IS:

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

I AM TELLING MY UNION STORY TO MOVE MY LISTENER(S)/AUDIENCE TO:

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

THE “HOOK” FOR MY STORY IS:

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

THE MAIN POINTS OF MY STORY ARE:

Main Point #1:

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Main Point #2:

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Main Point #3:

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

FIVE KEYS WORDS/PHRASES TO HELP ME REMEMBER MY MAIN POINT(S) ARE:

1. __________________________
2. __________________________
3. __________________________
4. __________________________
5. __________________________

HERSTORY – Handout 2
Outlining Your Story
SAMPLE OUTLINE

Inspiring political, social justice, and labor leaders all understand the value of storytelling to connect people for action and engagement. Storytelling is a powerful component of leadership building and it is at the core of effective labor-management relations and motivating union member involvement.

Outlining your union story will help you focus on the point(s) you want to make and the goal(s) you want to accomplish by telling it.

THE OVERALL MESSAGE OF MY UNION STORY IS:

Getting involved with my Local Union changed my life in ways I didn’t expect, all for the better, and if you get involved it will change your life too.

MY LISTENER(S)/AUDIENCE IS:

The group of co-workers I have lunch with almost every day.

I AM TELLING MY UNION STORY TO MOVE MY LISTENER(S)/AUDIENCE TO:

Go to the next union meeting with me to learn more about our Local Union and maybe volunteer for a project.

THE “HOOK” FOR MY STORY IS:

I used to be totally against the union and said it was just there to protect lousy workers. But that all changed after I was targeted by my supervisor because of a personal disagreement and she disciplined me unfairly. I went to my steward, not expecting a lot of help. But she was so respectful and fought for me, even knowing how I had badmouthed the union. I learned a lot from that experience and it turned me around. Today, I am our Local Union Education Committee chair and thinking about running for an executive board position.

THE MAIN POINTS OF MY STORY ARE:

Main Point #1:

Ignorance is NOT bliss. It can make you miss opportunities to learn and find a whole new life path.

Main Point #2:

The union is for all workers by all workers. It’s only as strong as the membership.

Main Point #3:

Union meetings have a bad reputation! It’s where we all come together to share news, make important decisions, plan new projects, and socialize. My best friends are my union brothers and sisters!

FIVE KEYS WORDS/PHRASES TO HELP ME REMEMBER MY MAIN POINT(S) ARE:

1. Former union delinquent
2. Current union activist
3. My union is my family
4. Responsibility
5. Solidarity

opeiu494

The post Her Story appeared first on UAW.

Categories: News By Union

A Promise to Keep

UAW - 21 min 54 sec ago
Download the PDF of this workshop

An emerging body of motivational material discusses the relative failure of people to keep the “goals” they set compared to the relative success they have of keeping the “promises” they make to themselves.  A defined promise that you make to yourself is a great way to self-motivate positive personal change and growth.

Social scientific evidence exists to show that people generally have a deep emotional commitment to keeping the promises they make, and that the desire to keep a promise isn’t driven by a desire to “hold up their end of the deal.”  An economics professor in Germany constructed an experiment to study the motivations people have in fulfilling their promises and the results compelled this conclusion.

Leaders know that keeping the promises they make – whether at home or at work – is essential to building and maintaining trust and creating conditions for even greater progress.  They are on time for meetings. They are on time with work deadlines. They are on time for social engagements.  It’s the same for leaders in the labor movement.

In fact, we may not think about this every day, but Article 6 of the UAW Constitution reminds us that when we joined our great union, we did so by signing a membership application where we made a “promise to abide by all laws, rules, regulations and the Constitution of the International Union.” (Emphasis added.)

This workshop helps participants identify and for a promise they want to make to themselves centered on increasing current union engagement and leadership.  Participants will be challenged to embrace new, specified opportunities in the union through their promise using the SMART (Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic, Time based) test.  Participants will commit their “SMART promise” to a written contract, sign it, and have a class member co-sign the contract as a “witness.”

By the end of this workshop, participants will understand:

  • Their self-motivation level and its impact on keeping their promise
  • How to form a specific promise, not a lofty goal
  • How being accountable to their commitment will empower them personally and fuel the union.

For this workshop, you will need:

  • Regular classroom set up
  • Class participant sign-in sheet
  • Name tents
  • Two flip charts and markers
  • Plain sheets of paper – one for each participant
  • Pen or pencil for each participant
  • Handout – Self-Motivation assessment quiz
  • Handout – A Promise to Keep to Myself & My Union Contract

Duration: This is a 2-hour workshop.

INTRO – 15 minutes

Notes to Instructor:  Welcome the class and provide class background and objectives as described in the cover page notes.  Emphasize that the classroom is a safe space for all participants.  Connect the class to labor and UAW experience and their leadership growth (“Union activists who keep their promises and commitments are entrusted with greater leadership opportunity”, “Making commitments to participate in union activities and keeping those commitments over time enriches your member satisfaction and leadership potential”). Highlight that this class is being held on the final full day of the Women’s Conference so that they can formulate an achievable promise to themselves to grow their union involvement and leadership based on the lessons they’ve learned throughout the week.

Say: Who in this room has made a New Year’s resolution (Raise your own hand.)  Anybody want to share a resolution they made? (Take several call outs.)

Say:  It’s August. Who’s still keeping the resolution?

Note to Instructor.  Results will vary.  Try to use participant responses to compare resolutions that weren’t kept (“want to lose weight”, “Want to quit smoking”) to those who really made a defined promise (“Want to lose 10 pounds by my daughter’s wedding by cutting out dessert Monday through Friday and walking 20 minutes every day”, “Want to cut smoking by limiting myself to six cigarettes a day).

Say: A 2014 study ranked the most popular New Year’s resolutions.  They were:

  1. Lose Weight
  2. Get Organized
  3. Spend less, save more
  4. Enjoy life to the fullest
  5. Stay fit and healthy
  6. Learn something exciting
  7. Quit smoking
  8. Help others in their dreams
  9. Fall in love
  10. Spend more time with family

Say: What about the resolution: “I’m going to get more involved in my union?” Has anyone ever made that resolution? What do you think the percentage is of those who successfully achieve their New Year’s resolution? (Take some guesses if you want.) The answer:   8 percent! Not a great track record.

Ask: Does anyone have some ideas about why those resolutions failed?  (Take call outs. Possible responses include: “Not specific. “Not attainable.” “Too general.” “Not measurable.” “No timeframe”).

Ask: What about the self-motivation to succeed?  Do you think that plays a role in making a change in yourself?  Let’s take a short quiz to see how self-motivated you are.

Note to Instructor: Distribute “Self ‘Motivation Assessment Quiz” handout. Give the class about 5 minutes to take the quiz.

Say: This quiz is designed to help you figure out where you fall on the self-motivation scale. Take a few minutes to HONESTLY answer the questions. We’re going to keep the scores private. Only you need to know the results. It’s a tool to help you.  Add up your responses and see whether your self-motivation is “High,” “Average” or “Low.”

Note to Instructor.  When it’s clear that everyone has completed the quiz, added their score, and seen what the results mean for them.

Say: We took the quiz so you could assess your self-motivation and better target the kind of promise you want to make to yourself.  Let’s turn to how we can structure a specific promise.

STRUCTURING THE PROMISE – 15 MINUTES

Note to the Instructor: On one flip chart, pre-chart the undefined and vague first resolution on the 2014 New Year’s resolutions list: “Lose Weight,” On the second flip chart, Write the title SMART Promises” and write the following in a list: Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic, Time Based.  You will explain to participants that a well-structured promise will meet the SMART conditions.

Say: Before we begin to structure our personal promises to ourselves to raise our Local Union participation and leadership, let’s work together on breaking down a very vague resolution and turning it into a measurable and attainable promise.

Say: “Lose Weight.” Is that Specific?  Can we Measure anything? Is there a Time component? How can we make “Lose weight” into a SMART promise? (Take call outs. “Add the specific target of 10 pounds.” “Add a time frame of “by my birthday.”) Continue to take call outs and offer suggestions yourself until a clear SMART promise is charted.

Note to instructor.  After you’ve reformulated that resolution into a SMART promise, turn the page on that flip chart and have the class choose another resolution to transform. Go through the same SMART assessment and redraft the weak resolution into a SMART promise. Tell participants that you think they are ready to choose and draft their own promise.

 

CHOOSING AND DRAFTING YOUR PROMISE – 25 minutes (By this point, you should be about half-way through the workshop.  You can allow for a 5-minute break here before starting the next half of the workshop.)

Say: I can tell that you’re all ready to move to the next step: Identifying a promise you want to make to yourself and structuring it so that it is a SMART promise. Remember, your SMART promise will center on you getting more engaged in your Local Union and more focused on growing and building your personal and union leadership.

Note to Instructor. This phase of the workshop will require participants to focus on what they want their SMART promise to be. Some participants may have a specific idea about their SMART promise. Others may need a brainstorming opportunity to get thoughts flowing.  Allow for small group brainstorming to take place at the tables, in pairs or with people turning their chairs to form groups of 4 (or so). Remind participants to refer to SMART promise flip chart to stay on track in the formation of their SMART promise. Make sure everyone has a blank piece of paper and pen or pencil to formulate their SMART promise.

Say: We’re going to spend the next 25 minutes brainstorming in small groups to help you identify the SMART promise you want to focus on in your contract. If you already know your promise, great! You can work and see whether you pick up any tips to help you develop your idea even more.  Use the sheet of paper to formulate your SMART promise. You’ll need to do some editing and revising to get to the real commitment language you need.  Once everyone is done, we’ll move to the next step of transferring your promise to your contract. Don’t forget to check in with the SMART promise flip chart to make sure you are on track.

Note to Instructor. Circulate through the room and offer and assistance that may be needed.  It will take some participants a few minutes to think of a commitment they want to fulfill and additional time to formulate it properly.  Furthermore, because participants will probably have different levels of union experience, their promises will vary based on those differences. Some will be loftier than others. Whatever the case, check in often to ensure that promises are in SMART form and whether they could be even “SMARTer,” with more specifics. When you see participants have all formulated their SMART promise, transition to the next phase of the workshop.

Say: it’s commitment time. It’s time for you to transfer your promise to a document that will be a contract with yourself. You’ll put the specifics in the contract, including the dates for completion. You’ll sign and date it, and a witness will sign and date it. Then, it’s yours to fulfill.

Note to instructorAllow 15 minutes for the contract-filling and signing part of this workshop. Distribute the handout entitled “A Promise to Keep to Myself and my Union.” Go through the document, explaining the different sections of the contract and their significance, in line with the SMART components. The signing portion may be significant for some, who want a close friend, you, or a classroom facilitator to serve as contract witness.

With the remaining time, have participants share their contract commitment to the class, either from their seat or in the front of the class. Leave 5 minutes for yourself to wrap up.

 

Say: Listening to all of your commitments to empower yourselves and engage with your union has been an amazing experience. Imagine the huge difference each of you will make when you return home and begin to fulfill your commitment, and how much energy and motivation you will gain by keeping your promise. Imagine the impact that the fulfillment of all the contracts being signed this afternoon will have across the country for 2014 Women’s Conference delegates and the entire UAW! Keep making new promises to yourself and to our union and we will make our union even stronger – together.

 

SELF MOTIVATION ASSESSMENT QUIZ

HOW MOTIVATED ARE YOU?

These questions are designed to help you determined how motivated you are. Read the statements below and rank each one as follows:

  • = ALWAYS 4 = MOSTLY      3 = SOMETIMES       2 = RARELY      1 = NEVER  

 

_____  1.   I believe in myself and my capabilities.

_____  2.   I am able to proactively deal with setbacks when they occur.

_____  3.   I believe that if I work hard and stay positive I will become successful.

_____  4.   I put maximum effort into each task and see any setbacks as a challenge to make improvements.

_____  5.   I actively set goals to achieve success.

_____  6.   Job satisfaction is extremely important for me to stay focused.

_____  7.   Doubts and fears do not tend to overshadow my goals and prevent me from being a success.

_____  8.   I have a clear vision for my future and think positively about the stepping stones I can take to get there.

_____  9.   I don’t tend to get stressed and worry about looming deadlines.

_____  10. When faced with barriers to overcome, I face them and don’t abandon those goals by setting new, less challenging ones.

_____  11. I am able to use rewards and consequences to stay focused on achieving my goals.

_____  12. When I think back, I tend to remember my successes rather than my setbacks and failures.

_____  13. When someone finds fault in something I do, I can accept the criticism and use it as a positive tool for personal growth.

TOTAL YOUR SCORE AND SEE BELOW TO DETERMINE YOUR

LEVEL OF SELF-MOTIVATION

 

41-65 – High:  You get things done and don’t let anything stand in your way. You make a conscious effort to stay self-motivated and you spend significant time and effort setting commitments and acting to accomplish those commitments. You attract and inspire others with your success.

27-40 – Average:  You have a good level of self-motivation, but there is a lot more you can achieve. With the right improvements, you could really excel. Try to focus more on your achievements, however small you think they may be. Take the time to develop a clear vision for yourself to help identify the changes you want to make for yourself.

13-26 – Low: You let your personal doubts and fears keep you from succeeding. You’ve probably had a few incomplete commitments in the past and think you aren’t self-motivated or capable of seeing those commitments to completion. Break this harmful pattern now and start believing in yourself again!

A PROMISE TO KEEP TO MYSELF & MY UNION

I enter this contract with myself to fulfill my responsibility as a UAW member by bringing my talent and participation to the activities of my Local Union, thereby growing my personal and union leadership skills and reaping the satisfaction of knowing that I am helping improve the quality of life for myself, my family, my UAW brothers and sisters and my community.

THEREFORE:

From________________________________  to___________________________________________

 

I promise to:

I plan to accomplish this promise by:

 

 

If I keep this promise, I will be rewarded with:
___________________________________                    ___________________

(Signature)                                                            (Date)

 

___________________________________                   ____________________

(Witness Signature)                                                             (Date)

HERSTORY – Handout 2

Outlining Your Story

SAMPLE OUTLINE

 

Inspiring political, social justice, and labor leaders all understand the value of storytelling to connect people for action and engagement. Storytelling is a powerful component of leadership building and it is at the core of effective labor-management relations and motivating union member involvement.

Outlining your union story will help you focus on the point(s) you want to make and the goal(s) you want to accomplish by telling it.

 

 

THE OVERALL MESSAGE OF MY UNION STORY IS:

 

Getting involved with my Local Union changed my life in ways I didn’t expect, all for the better, and if you get involved it will change your life too.

 

MY LISTENER(S)/AUDIENCE IS:

 

The group of co-workers I have lunch with almost every day.

 

I AM TELLING MY UNION STORY TO MOVE MY LISTENER(S)/AUDIENCE TO:

 

Go to the next union meeting with me to learn more about our Local Union and maybe volunteer for a project.

 

THE “HOOK” FOR MY STORY IS:

 

I used to be totally against the union and said it was just there to protect lousy workers. But that all changed after I was targeted by my supervisor because of a personal disagreement and she disciplined me unfairly. I went to my steward, not expecting a lot of help. But she was so respectful and fought for me, even knowing how I had badmouthed the union. I learned a lot from that experience and it turned me around. Today, I am our Local Union Education Committee chair and thinking about running for an executive board position.

 

 

THE MAIN POINTS OF MY STORY ARE:

 

Main Point #1:

 

Ignorance is NOT bliss. It can make you miss opportunities to learn and find a whole new life path.

 

Main Point #2:

 

The union is for all workers by all workers. It’s only as strong as the membership.

 

Main Point #3:

 

Union meetings have a bad reputation! It’s where we all come together to share news, make important decisions, plan new projects, and socialize. My best friends are my union brothers and sisters!

 

FIVE KEY WORDS/PHRASES TO HELP ME REMEMBER MY MAIN POINT(S) ARE:

 

  1. Former union delinquent
  2. Current union activist
  3. My union is my family
  4. Responsibility
  5. Solidarity

The post A Promise to Keep appeared first on UAW.

Categories: News By Union

UAW Member Lloyd Allen on Hillary Voting to Save the Auto Industry

UAW - Thu, 09/29/2016 - 16:42
Lloyd Allen UAW Region 1A, Local 900

The post UAW Member Lloyd Allen on Hillary Voting to Save the Auto Industry appeared first on UAW.

Categories: News By Union

UAL, CAL, CMI Mechanics SPECIAL Update - September 28, 2016

Teamsters - Thu, 09/29/2016 - 15:27

As reported last week; at the direction of the NMB, the negotiating committee and company representatives were summoned to Washington, DC this week to meet with the federal mediators in hopes of resolving the outstanding issues of concern. The meetings started on September 26th with each party explaining their positions to the mediators. The next two days were spent in discussions with both parties explaining their positions and offering potential solutions in order reach consensus on the areas of concern.

http://teamsterair.org/node/2495
Categories: News By Union

Teamsters, United Airlines Reach Tentative Agreement for Technicians

Teamsters - Thu, 09/29/2016 - 10:34

(WASHINGTON) – Following an agreement in principle on August 12, 2016, the International Brotherhood of Teamsters has reached a tentative agreement with United Airlines on a six-year joint collective bargaining agreement covering more than 9,000 technicians, finalizing the language in the contract.

Categories: News By Union

BLET Legislative Representatives Meet in Washington

Teamsters - Thu, 09/29/2016 - 07:13

Legislative Representatives of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and Trainmen (BLET) met at Teamsters headquarters in Washington this week.

Categories: News By Union

With convention complete, focus returns to pressing issues

IBB - Thu, 09/29/2016 - 06:04
Solidarity will help energize, guide our union

THE 33RD CONSOLIDATED Convention brought together Boilermakers from across the United States and Canada to perform the vital work of reaffirming our constitution and electing officers. We can be proud that delegates accomplished these goals while representing, with great passion and conviction, the interests of our membership.

Categories: News By Union

Feds, Retirees to Pay 6.2% More in Health Insurance Premiums

AFGE - Wed, 09/28/2016 - 16:00
Federal employees and retirees will pay 6.2% more on average for health insurance premiums next year. This unacceptably high increase will hit millions of Americans in the pocketbook, making coverage less and less affordable and will cause many to drop coverage. Read More
Categories: News By Union

TAKE ACTION: Rally in Flint, MI – Get out the Vote for Hillary Clinton

UAW - Wed, 09/28/2016 - 13:47

Come join activists from around Michigan in Flint for one of Michigan’s largest rallies.

WHO: UAW Members and their families WHAT: Get out the vote rally for Hillary Clinton WHERE: UAW Local 599
812 Leith St.
Flint, MI 48505 WHEN: Saturday, October 1, from 10 AM – Noon

The post TAKE ACTION: Rally in Flint, MI – Get out the Vote for Hillary Clinton appeared first on UAW.

Categories: News By Union

Local 268 joins with riders to launch voter registration drive

ATU - Wed, 09/28/2016 - 12:34
As part of National Voter Registration Day, ATU Local 268-Cleveland, OH members and riders set up shop at three transit hubs in the city to register people to vote.
Categories: News By Union

Feds: XPO/Con-way Must Bargain With Teamsters

Teamsters - Wed, 09/28/2016 - 12:28

A federal court has denied XPO/Con-way’s efforts to set aside the workers’ decision to form their union as Teamsters, which means the company needs to recognize the Teamsters as the workers’ bargaining representative.

Categories: News By Union

Workers and Community Stand United to Save Howard University Hospital

AFSCME - Wed, 09/28/2016 - 12:04

On Saturday, hundreds of Howard University Hospital (HUH) employees and community members rallied to highlight the important role the hospital plays in the community. From providing healthcare to freed slaves during the Civil War to its current role as the  only teaching hospital attached to a historically black college or university, the HUH, formerly Freedmen’s Hospital, has a rich history of addressing the needs of under-served communities with high quality healthcare.

Attendees demonstrated their continued commitment to their community with free health screenings and information about the services available at HUH. Members of 1199DC National Union of Hospital and Health Care Employees (NUHHCE), AFSCME, which represents over 600 workers, are working together with hospital management to enhance hospital operations and improve the quality of care for DC residents.

“The women and men who work in Howard University Hospital understand the significance of the vital services they provide to their community and are committed to preserving and improving them. We have worked with the hospital administration to turn around the hospital,” said Wanda Shelton-Martin, District 1199DC NUHHCE, AFSCME, area director. “It is important that we spread the word that the hospital is open and provides high quality care to the surrounding community.”

The hospital faced tough economic times, resulting in lay-offs. Shelton-Martin warned, “if the community doesn’t return to the hospital, they will continue to have cuts and eventually close. It would be a disgrace to the legacy of one of DC’s most important foundations to have it close and hurt the surrounding community.”

Emergency services in the District are outsourced and patients select where they want to be taken, unlike the rotating system that previously existed. Workers and management alike realized how important it is that the community know that top-notch services are available right in their own neighborhood. Following the rally, the union and hospital management intend to launch their next campaign ‘Take Me to Howard’ to encourage residents to choose HUH. Often EMS drivers pass HUH on their way to other city hospitals.

“If we are going to survive and preserve the amazing history of Howard, we must all come together,” said Henry Nicholas, president of NUHHCE and an AFSCME international vice president.

Categories: News By Union

Teamsters Local 653 Organizes Mechanics, Achieves First Contract for Drivers and Monitors

Teamsters - Wed, 09/28/2016 - 11:22

(SOUTH EASTON, Mass.) – Workers in the South Easton area have organized and ratified a first contract at two separate bus companies with the assistance of Local 653.

Categories: News By Union

33rd Convention sets course for future

IBB - Wed, 09/28/2016 - 11:16
Delegates vote on constitutional changes, officers

NEARLY 500 DELEGATES representing Boilermaker local lodges, districts and councils across the United States and Canada met at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas July 18-21 to chart the Brotherhood's course for the next five years. Sixty-seven delegates-at-large also attended, along with International staff and administrative employees.

Categories: News By Union

More than 14,000 drivers for Uber, Lyft sign cards to join ATU

ATU - Wed, 09/28/2016 - 10:14
Drivers rallied outside of the NYC Taxi & Limousine Commission said they signed union cards to join the ATU Local 1181 to combat shrinking pay, strict driver policies handed down by management and a sky-high commissions the apps charge them on fares.
Categories: News By Union

Listen to Teamster Nation News for Sept. 28-Oct. 4

Teamsters - Wed, 09/28/2016 - 07:36

Teamster Women Gather to Share Solidarity; Union Members, Local 2010 Protest for Fair UC Contract in Hollywood; Pension Proposal Threatens Retirement Security; Appeals Court Sides with Teamsters; BLET Calls Out Effort to Loosen Break Inspection Rules; Contract News; This Week in Teamster Music; Poll Shows Public Doubt of Trade Deals

Categories: News By Union

Major Economic Indicators Latest Numbers

Money Headlines - Wed, 09/28/2016 - 06:32

Consumer Price Index (CPI):
+0.2% in Aug 2016
News Release
Historical Data

Unemployment Rate:
4.9% in Aug 2016
News Release
Historical Data

Payroll Employment:
+151,000(p) in Aug 2016
News Release
Historical Data

Average Hourly Earnings:
+$0.03(p) in Aug 2016
News Release
Historical Data

Producer Price Index - Final Demand:
unchanged in Aug 2016
News Release
Historical Data

Employment Cost Index (ECI):
+0.6% in 2nd Qtr of 2016
News Release
Historical Data

Productivity:
-0.6%(r) in 2nd Qtr of 2016
News Release
Historical Data

U.S. Import Price Index:
-0.2% in Aug 2016
News Release
Historical Data

U.S. Export Price Index:
-0.8% in Aug 2016
News Release
Historical Data

p- preliminary

Categories: Union News

Register to vote today!

UAW - Tue, 09/27/2016 - 12:03

Making sure your voice is heard is of utmost importance in this upcoming presidential election. Registering to vote is easier than ever. Here’s a tool to quickly register to vote. Click “Register to vote” down the page in blue to get started.

My Vote, My Right, the AFL-CIO’s voter protection and education program, is a nonpartisan effort to raise awareness on voting rights, educate voters on new voting laws, and ensure voters are able to vote fairly and without intimidation—and that those votes are counted. Check out these resources to protect your right to vote.

Register to VoteIt's easy and fast

 

The post Register to vote today! appeared first on UAW.

Categories: News By Union

Airline Division News, Week Ending, September 24, 2016

Teamsters - Tue, 09/27/2016 - 10:35

A three-judge panel for the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled Monday that Amerijet must follow a district court order to arbitrate labor disputes with Teamsters who are temporarily based in the Caribbean.

http://teamsterair.org/node/2493
Categories: News By Union

Presidential Debate Reaffirms Clinton as Choice for Working Families

AFSCME - Tue, 09/27/2016 - 09:36

Working families across the country tuned in to watch last night’s presidential debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, and what they saw should reaffirm their choice of Hillary Clinton for President of the United States.

In her answers, Secretary Clinton shared a vision for our country that is aligned with the values, hopes and economic interests of American middle class families. She would make the wealthiest in our nation pay their fair share of taxes to invest in the future of our communities; she would make college education more affordable and alleviate the burden of student loan debt; she would raise the federal minimum wage and add protections for workers who have no paid sick days or parental leave.

“The central question in this election is really what kind of country we want to be and what kind of future we'll build together,” she said. “Today is my granddaughter's second birthday, so I think about this a lot. First, we have to build an economy that works for everyone, not just those at the top. That means we need new jobs, good jobs, with rising incomes.”

Trump, by contrast, would give the very rich a tax break, promoting a failed theory that when the rich get richer the rest of us somehow benefit as well. Called trickle-down economics, it’s a failed theory that has contributed to income inequality over the past three decades.

“I don't think top-down works in America,” Secretary Clinton said. “I think building the middle class, investing in the middle class, making college debt-free so more young people can get their education, helping people refinance their debt from college at a lower rate. Those are the kinds of things that will really boost the economy. Broad-based, inclusive growth is what we need in America, not more advantages for people at the very top.”

AFSCME members support Hillary Clinton because she is committed to fixing our out-of-balance economy and to raising incomes for hardworking people. We want a President who will make it easier instead of harder to join together in strong unions and stand together for wages and benefits that can sustain our families.

Hillary Clinton will tackle the issues that affect ordinary Americans’ quality of life, and last night’s presidential debate reaffirmed that. She shares AFSCME’s values and is a proven champion for working families.

Categories: News By Union